'Crash for cash' gang ordered to pay back £37,000

The gang have now been ordered to pay back over 37,000.
The gang have now been ordered to pay back over 37,000.

A gang convicted of a 'crash for cash' scam have been ordered to pay back more than £37,000.

In April, 11 people were jailed for more than 42 years for their part in the scam after being connected to over 111 claims going back to 2011, and believed to be worth more than £500,000.

After a series of confiscation hearings, which concluded on November 3, the group have now been ordered to pay back £37,493.96 collectively.

The scam, which saw the gang deliberately targeting innocent motorists by crashing into them on public roads then submitting fraudulent insurance claims for financial gain, came to light after a Derbyshire Police investigation, which began in 2013.

Martin Walker, formerly of Hopton Close, Ripley, who was jailed for five years and three months, has now been ordered to pay back £13,253.94.

Arsalaan Hussain, formerly of New Street, Brierley, Bradford, who was jailed for four years, has been ordered to pay back £11,504.00.

Adeel Aziz must pay £7,273.

Davinder Nagra, formerly of Arkwright Avenue, Belper, who was jailed for five years, must pay back £2,500.

Adam Stark, formerly of Trenton Drive, Long Eaton, who was jailed for four years for fraud and nine months for perverting the course of justice, must pay £2,434.59.

Nicola Brown, formerly of Edinburgh Court, Alfreton, who was jailed for 21 months, must pay £400.

Dharminder Nagra, formerly of Gregory’s Way, Belper, who was jailed for five years, must pay £67.48.

Muhammad Ashgar, who was jailed for five years, must pay £60.95.

They now have up to three months to pay.

Dorothy Bacon, formerly of Cedar Avenue, Ripley, who was jailed for 30 months; Liam Swinfield, formerly of Northfield Avenue, Sawley, who was jailed for 31 months; Naseer Ahmed, who was jailed for five years, three months; and Anthony Walker, formerly of Loscoe Road, Heanor, who was jailed for 18 months, all received nominal orders as they had no assets to confiscate. This means that the Crown Court can confiscate any assets they obtain in the future up to the amount they made from their criminal activity.

Jason Potter, Insurance Fraud Bureau Head of Investigations, said: “This gang was a group of calculated individuals who were putting the lives of innocent motorists at risk for profit without a second thought.

"The prison sentences they are currently serving already demonstrate how we are clamping down on these criminals and these confiscation orders go a step further to send a clear message that insurance fraud will not be tolerated.”