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School league table winners and losers

File photo dated 08/02/12 of a teacher helping a pupil during a lesson. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Friday June 15, 2012. Four-fifths of teachers have sacrificed a night's sleep in the last six months to get through school work, according to a survey. It reveals that many teachers are spending time at the weekend and during holidays trying to catch up with marking, lesson planning and admin. The poll, by tesconnect.com, suggests that the idea that teachers finish work at 3pm and take long holidays is a myth, with the majority working more than 56 hours a week on average. In total, around 80% of the teachers questioned said they sacrificed a night's sleep to get through a backlog of work, with 41.7% giving up a night in the last month. More than three-quarters (78%) of around 1,600 people surveyed agreed that during term-time they spend every Sunday afternoon or evening working on preparing lessons, while almost two-thirds (64%) said the 'hidden' hours they spend on school-related work, for example at

File photo dated 08/02/12 of a teacher helping a pupil during a lesson. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Friday June 15, 2012. Four-fifths of teachers have sacrificed a night's sleep in the last six months to get through school work, according to a survey. It reveals that many teachers are spending time at the weekend and during holidays trying to catch up with marking, lesson planning and admin. The poll, by tesconnect.com, suggests that the idea that teachers finish work at 3pm and take long holidays is a myth, with the majority working more than 56 hours a week on average. In total, around 80% of the teachers questioned said they sacrificed a night's sleep to get through a backlog of work, with 41.7% giving up a night in the last month. More than three-quarters (78%) of around 1,600 people surveyed agreed that during term-time they spend every Sunday afternoon or evening working on preparing lessons, while almost two-thirds (64%) said the 'hidden' hours they spend on school-related work, for example at

Latest figures on school performance show that despite top institutions surpassing the national average, others are lagging far behind.

The average number of pupils who got five A* to C GCSE grades was 59.1 per cent in Derbyshire – just below the national average of 59.2.

The best performing school at Key Stage Four in the area was Hope Valley College, with results ranking it the sixth best school in the county and the best in North Derbyshire.

Out of 114 pupils eligible to sit GCSEs, 81 per cent achieved five A* to C grades – up from 57 per cent in 2012.

Principal, Bernard Hunter, said: “Our results are particularly pleasing as they reflect the commitment and hard work of students, staff and parents. Our results in 2012 were in line with the county average, this year we have significantly exceeded this.”

Another top performing school was St Mary’s Catholic High School, who were ranked seventh and saw 80 per cent of pupils get five of the top grades.

The worst performing school in the area – where only 37 per cent of pupils got five A* to Cs – was Parkside Community School, Chesterfield.

The Bolsover School was ranked 49th out of the county’s schools, with 42 per cent of the 148 pupils eligible scoring five A* to C grades – down from 57 per cent in 2012.

A Derbyshire County Council spokesperson admitted they authority faced some challenges, but added: “It’s great to see that young people in the county are bucking the national trend in some of the most important areas.”

 

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