‘Refuse collections will be fortnightly’- Derbyshire Dales District Council

Helen Spencer, one of Derbyshire Dales District Council customer service advisers, modelling the new blue-lidded recycling bin.

Helen Spencer, one of Derbyshire Dales District Council customer service advisers, modelling the new blue-lidded recycling bin.

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RUBBISH collections in the Dales are to go fortnightly this summer as part of cost-cutting measure by Derbyshire Dales District Council, but say the move will see increased recycling opportunities.

The council announced its freeze on council tax this week, and as part of its efforts to slash spending, will overhaul the recycling collections.

New bins will be rolled out to households including a new weekly-collected food waste caddy, and a new large blue wheelie bin for all recycling material, including plastics, which will be picked up fortnightly.

The council says it will save up to £385,000 a year after striking a deal with a new contractor, Serco Ltd.

As part of the move, collections for general waste will be cut back to fortnightly.

Leader of the council, Cllr Lewis Rose OBE, explained: “It’s been a long and arduous process but we believe we will improve the service.

“It will increase recycling to nearly 62 per cent by the time we have finished and at the same time, save money.

“The consultation for the area was very positive, but we have listened very carefully to what people want to say.”

Chief executive of the council, David Wheatcroft, said food waste sat in bins for up to two weeks had been the main worry with fortnightly collections, but said the issue will be eliminated thanks to the new food caddies.

He added: “All the consultations we have done suggests that the issue people were most concerned about was food – that was the key issue, especially in the summer – they don’t want food waste in bins for two weeks.”

The council says the move will help divert more waste away from landfill and help to achieve the Government’s recycling target of 50 per cent by 2020.

But the move has already generated interest, with readers leaving more than 130 messages on the Mercury’s Facebook page. Some described it as being “nonsense” while others have added their support saying it has worked fine in other parts of the country.

Meanwhile, Mayor of Matlock, Cllr Barry Hopkinson said: “In principal I have no objections, I have friends who live in the south who already have this and they say it works brilliantly. But I do have some reservations as to where many people are going to put these news bins they get.”

The new system is due to be rolled out in August. Alternative systems will be introduced for properties that cannot accommodate wheeled bins.

He added: “All the consultations we have done suggests that the issue people were most concerned about was food – that was the key issue, especially in the summer – they don’t want food waste in bins for two weeks.”

The council says the move will help divert more waste away from landfill and help to achieve the Government’s recycling target of 50 per cent by 2020.

But the move has already generated interest, with readers leaving more than 130 messages on the Mercury’s Facebook page. Some described it as being “nonsense” while others have added their support saying it has worked fine in other parts of the country.

Meanwhile, Mayor of Matlock, Cllr Barry Hopkinson said: “In principal I have no objections, I have friends who live in the south who already have this and they say it works brilliantly. But I do have some reservations as to where many people are going to put these news bins they get.”

The new system is due to be rolled out in August. Alternative systems will be introduced for properties that cannot accommodate wheeled bins.