Tramway village scoop award for heritage education

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Crich Tramway Village has just achieved The Sandford Award for Heritage Education for the second time.

Registered as a national educational charity, the museum and visitor attraction offers learning opportunities for all ages.

There are three main exhibitions to explore, telling the story of tramways and the growth of the museum – from the Industrial Revolution through the decline of tramways, to their resurgence in some of our major cities – there is something for everyone.

Children can discover George Stephenson’s connection to the museum, learn about Mr Train’s trams and uncover the story of the tram that became a home. They can also discover the origins of the buildings and street furniture and find out about the events and inventions that shaped a century of trams.

As well as offering spectacular views over the Derwent Valley, the stroll through the woodland walk and sculpture trail enables children to learn about nature and historic developments around the site.

All of the education sessions have strong connections to the site and its collection and make use of the whole village.

The restored Blackpool Balcony Car 40 at Crich Tramway Village.

The restored Blackpool Balcony Car 40 at Crich Tramway Village.

Jan Barratt, learning and participation manager at Crich Tramway Village, said: “We’re delighted to receive The Sandford Award for Heritage Education for the second time. We’re really proud of our school learning programme and this award recognises the hard work of the learning team.”

Lead judge for The Sandford Award Amanda Phillipson, added: “Crich Tramway Village offers a high quality learning experience. The education programme makes the most of its unique selling points and the offer reflects the site as a whole. There is clear commitment to the continuation of a quality offer by the learning manager, who is enthusiastic and passionate.”

The village will be open from 10 am to 5.30pm until October 30.