W&M under 12s do their club proud

Wirksworth and Middleton u12s.''Back row - left to right - Harry Wanford, James McCabe, Jason Wanford (coach), Harrison Fern and Kyle Pearce.'Front row left to right are Michael Wright, Charlie Mellor, Liam Temperton, Richard Tunnicliffe.
Wirksworth and Middleton u12s.''Back row - left to right - Harry Wanford, James McCabe, Jason Wanford (coach), Harrison Fern and Kyle Pearce.'Front row left to right are Michael Wright, Charlie Mellor, Liam Temperton, Richard Tunnicliffe.
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Wirksworth and Middleton under 12s took on Denby under 12s in an eagerly-awaited contest that Denby eventually won by 20 runs.

This Champion of Champions eight-a-side fixture was a happy occasion, featuring two teams who are both unbeaten winners of their respective leagues.

Each side has 16 overs to bat with four pairs having four overs each.

Dismissals mean five runs deducted from the total (which begins at 100). Apart from the wicketkeeper, everyone on the fielding side has to bowl, either two or three overs, while wides and no-balls count as two extras.

W&M batted first, having lost the toss, and all eight players contributed.

Charlie Mellor and Harry Wanford accumulated 23 runs with one dismissal resulting in a very creditable net 18 runs from their four overs.

Unfortunately, the next eight overs saw no advance. Six wickets fell, cancelling out the 30 runs scored. The final pair, Richard Tunnicliffe and Liam Temperton repaired the damage somewhat, lifting the net total to 130.

While there were quality strokes throughout, if there is a criticism to be made it is that W&M’s batting seemed, almost apologetic.

The point was illustrated immediately in Denby’s reply when the first two deliveries, perfectly decent ones, were stroked through for boundaries. The batsman was Ben Chapman-Lily (a Derbyshire youth player) who made 24, the best score of the match.

The bowlers stuck to it valiantly and Denby’s net score after four overs was just two runs better than W&M’s at the same stage. After 12, they were 142 (having lost five wickets) which is where the real advantage of batting second becomes apparent. As long as the last pair didn’t lose more than two wickets Denby would win.

In the event they didn’t and so won the game – and the cup.

Denby’s Jack Wilson was deservedly player of the match for his all-round batting and bowling contributions but all 16 players deserve credit for an entertaining evening.