DVLA shares images of tax scam messages – here’s what to watch out for

DVLA shares images of tax scam messages – here’s what to watch out for
DVLA shares images of tax scam messages – here’s what to watch out for

The DVLA has released images of some of the scam messages sent to drivers by criminal gangs trying to rip them off.

Fraudsters regularly target British motorists with fake messages in efforts to steal bank details from the unwary.

The messages usually come as text messages or emails, claiming to be from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency and often relate to vehicle tax.

In an effort to help drivers spot and avoid the cons, the licensing agency, tweeted a selection of the most recent messages.

Threatening fines

Some claim that a motorist’s latest car tax payment is overdue or has failed due to a problem with incorrect bank account details, threatening that this is their “last chance” to pay and avoid a £1,000 fine. They then contain a link to a fake DVLA website where victims are asked to make a payment or enter their bank details.

Read more: DVLA’s top tips for avoid online scams

Other message take the opposite approach and inform the driver that they are due a car tax refund but again contain a link to a phishing website designed to steal their bank details.

The DVLA says it never contacts drivers regarding payment information via text or email and drivers should ignore any such messages.

A DVLA spokesman said: “We don’t send emails or text messages that ask you to confirm your personal details or payment information, such as for a vehicle tax refund. If you get anything like this, don’t open any links and delete the email or text immediately.

“The only official place to find our services and information is on gov.uk.”

(Photo: DVLA)

Read more: ‘Are red cars faster?’ and ‘is this rash normal?’ – the weirdest questions drivers have asked the DVLA

He also warned of other third-party websites either trying to steal drivers’ details or charging fees for services which are free through the official DVLA website.

The spokesman added: “To try and pass themselves off as genuine, these sites might include ‘DVLA’ in their web address (URL). They might also design their site to appear as if it’s DVLA – for example, using DVLA’s old ‘green triangle’ logo, which we no longer use.

“Don’t be fooled by these sites – even if they appear at the top of search engine results. Always double check you’re using gov.uk.”

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