Bakewell infants’ poignant tribute to 503 men who served in First World War

Bakewell Infants School re-enact farming tribunal from 1917.
Bakewell Infants School re-enact farming tribunal from 1917.

Pupils from Bakewell Infants School will be paying tribute to those men from the area who served in the Great War.
The youngsters will be carrying specially designed wreaths bearing 503 names at the re-creation of Bakewell’s peace celebrations on November 12.
There will be the traditional red poppy for those that fell, purple poppies for the horses which perished and yellow poppies for those that survived and came back.

At 1pm the whole school is going to march round the gardens opposite the school, in costume and carrying the wreaths, stopping at the memorial. After a short service, all will then be invited back to the school for unveiling of a ceramic memorial that the children have made, and for a First World War tea.
At 11 o’clock on the morning of November 12, the Year 2s will take part in a children’s sports event inspired by the Bakewell Peace Celebrations Children’s Sports Programme from Saturday, July 19, 1919 which was discovered at the Bakewell Old House Museum. There will be a running race, three legged race, girls skipping race and boys sack football.
These activities will be the highlight of a programme of studies into the history of the Great War, thanks to the Heritage Lottery Fund,

Part of their lessons included a reimagining of a farming tribunal from 1917, which is pictured. During the re-enactment the children met William Shimwell who was applying on behalf of his son Luther, his cowman, to keep him on the farm and not be sent to join the Army. Mr Shimwell seemed to think that he was having a hard time but Mr Eyre, the chairman, was not sympathetic especially when he refused to put his daughters to work on the farm. Derbyshire farmers were very resistant to women on the land, but usually were happy with women from their own families working on the farms.

The Year 1 pupils explored the impact of the war on food and farming with Gertie Whitfield from Whitworks Adventures in Theatre (WAT). 
The children’s studies looked at the horses’ roles in farming. Working with writer Paul Whitfield (WAT) the children created a story about two horses split up by the war. The children developed the story in to a picture book called “Kitty and Belmont Go to War” which will be printed and given to them and the community at the celebration event on November 12.

The youngsters will be carrying specially designed wreaths bearing 503 names at the re-creation of Bakewell’s peace celebrations on November 12.
There will be the traditional red poppy for those that fell, purple poppies for the horses which perished and yellow poppies for those that survived and came back.

At 1pm the whole school is going to march round the gardens opposite the school, in costume and carrying the wreaths. After a short service, there will the unveiling of a ceramic memorial in school which the children have made, followed by a First World War tea.
At 11 o’clock on the morning of November 12, the Year 2s will take part in a children’s sports event inspired by the Bakewell Peace Celebrations Children’s Sports Programme from Saturday, July 19, 1919 which was discovered at the Bakewell Old House Museum. There will be a running race, three-legged race, girls skipping race and boys sack football.
These activities will be the highlight of a programme of studies into the history of the Great War, thanks to the Heritage Lottery Fund,

Part of their lessons included a reimagining of a farming tribunal from 1917, which is pictured. During the re-enactment the children met William Shimwell who was applying on behalf of his son Luther, his cowman, to keep him on the farm and not be sent to join the Army. Mr Shimwell seemed to think that he was having a hard time but Mr Eyre, the chairman, was not sympathetic especially when he refused to put his daughters to work on the farm. Derbyshire farmers were very resistant to women on the land, but usually were happy with women from their own families working on the farms.

The Year 1 pupils explored the impact of the war on food and farming with Gertie Whitfield from Whitworks Adventures in Theatre (WAT). 
The children’s studies looked at the horses’ roles in farming. Working with writer Paul Whitfield (WAT) the youngsters created a story about two horses split up by the war. The children developed the story in to a picture book called “Kitty and Belmont Go to War” which will be printed and given to them and the community at the celebration event on November 12.

Head teacher Tricia Outram said: “This project has been fascinating to follow and see how engaged the children have been when learning about their local history. We are looking forward to the event and rounding off all they have learned with lots of fun as well as reflecting on the serious side of remembrance”.