Buxton MRT’s new £45,000 response vehicle dedicated to memory of stalwart supporter

The new Buxton Mountain Rescue Team vehicle.
The new Buxton Mountain Rescue Team vehicle.

Buxton Mountain Rescue Team has dedicated its new £45,000 specialist response vehicle in memory of its late president Ian Hurst MBE.

The Toyota Hilux four-wheel drive vehicle is the latest addition to the volunteer force’s rescue fleet and will become its primary response vehicle.

The new Buxton Mountain Rescue Team vehicle has been dedicated to the memory of the late team president, Ian Hurst, and was unveiled by Ian's widow Zan and her family, pictured here with BMRT Vehicle Officer, Matt Simmon.

The new Buxton Mountain Rescue Team vehicle has been dedicated to the memory of the late team president, Ian Hurst, and was unveiled by Ian's widow Zan and her family, pictured here with BMRT Vehicle Officer, Matt Simmon.

It replaces the team’s ten-year-old Land Rover, enabling continued access to casualties via tracks and unmade roads as well as providing an all-year, all-weather capability on the roads.

Team-member Roger Bennett said: “The Toyota Hilux compliments the existing fleet of three vehicles, and each has a specific role in the team’s response depending on the nature of the call-out.”

The new vehicle bears an inscription in memory of Buxton resident Ian Hurst, a stalwart supporter of mountain rescue who died recently. Ian’s widow, Zan, together with family members, attended the team’s Dove Holes base last week for the official unveiling.

Careful budgeting by the charity built up a cash fund towards the cost of the vehicle, which was backed by a public fundraising campaign.

The inscription on the new vehicle, dedicated to Ian Hurst.

The inscription on the new vehicle, dedicated to Ian Hurst.

Among the individual supporters was Ben Brindley, from Tideswell, who ran seven marathons in seven days to raise £2,000, and Becky Higton whose sponsored climb of Mount Kilimanjaro contributed £5,000 after the team went to her aid during a fell race in 2014.

Roger thanked everyone who had contributed over the last two years to make the purchase possible.

He said: “Donations come in all sizes, from small personal gifts to larger commercial grants from trusts and clubs. Every gift is greatly appreciated and without that super support the team would not be able to remain operational.

“As the team gets busier year on year the financial burden of providing the voluntary service grows. Team members give their time for rescues freely without a second thought, but the continued financial support of the public is essential to providing the service, which is free of charge to anyone in distress in a remote area.”